Monday, May 25, 2020

The Grand Canyon National Park - 781 Words

Grand Canyon National Park Army Lieutenant Joseph Christmas Ives was the first American to ever lay eyes on the Grand Canyon. He deemed it â€Å"altogether valueless†, and he believed that â€Å"ours has been the first and will undoubtedly be the last, party of whites to visit the locality. It seems intended by nature that the Colorado River along the greater portion of its lonely and majestic way, shall be forever unvisited and disturbed† (Powell, 3-4). Looking out at the vast beauty of the Grand Canyon, he was sure that it would never have any importance, and nobody would want to see it. Today, Grand Canyon National Park is one of the greatest and most well-known natural landmarks in all of the United States. The Grand Canyon is considered one of the 7 Wonders of the Natural World. Within its cracks and bends, the Grand Canyon tells a story of the Native American people, and the roots and history of our nation. The Grand Canyon is essentially surrounded by various Native American tribes and reservations, including the Navajo Nation Reservation. The Navajo Nation Reservation, spans 27,000 square miles and spreads across three states: Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Within its borders lies monuments, national parks, and of course, Navajo people living traditional lifestyles. This brings in modern day tourists into the reservations which are a different world within our own, where they don’t have electricity and they live closely kindred lives with nature. The Grand Canyon is physicallyShow MoreRelatedEvolution Of The Grand Canyon National Park1824 Words   |  8 PagesThe evolution of the Grand Canyon National Park has been one of the marvels of the world to which many researchers had dedicated substantial amount of controversial studies in attempt to accurately estimate the origin of the canyons and caves/gorges ages and Colorado Plateau current attained mean elevation of nearly horizontal sedimentary rocks based on numerous scientific interpretation of new research data without consideration of a slew of prior geologic data sets that confused geologists manyRead MoreGrand Canyon Essay Outline968 Words   |  4 Pages Grand Canyon The Grand Canyon is one of the greatest natural creations our planet has to offer. Have you ever been mesmerized by the giant cliffs, massive ridges, or the wide array of beautiful colors? If you answered yes, this paper is just for you! After reading this, you will be well educated about the Grand Canyon. The Grand Canyon is in the northwest corner of Arizona, bordering Utah and Nevada. Did you know that more than five million people visit Grand Canyon National Park per year? TheRead MoreThe Grand Canyon Railway1786 Words   |  8 PagesCASE 17 THE GRAND CANYON RAILWAY One interesting feature of the southwestern United States is the area known as the Four Comers. the only place in the United States where four slates meet at one point. Within the 130,000 square miles of the Colorado Plateau in this region lie many wonders of nature. The plateau contains eight national parks, twenty national monuments, as well as numerous other nationally designated areas and huge tracts of national forests. This wealth of natural features andRead MoreIntroduction The very famous National Park Grand Canyon is located in the state of Arizona. The2600 Words   |  11 Pagesvery famous National Park Grand Canyon is located in the state of Arizona. The canyon is carved by the Colorado River, which is an iconic feature within the canyon. The Grand Canyon park is on the area of 4 926 km ², it’s 277 miles long and up to 18 miles wide. The living history of Grand Canyon goes 10,500 years back in time, where it has been proven that people actually lived around there. Along with other cultures, Native Americans were on of the groups that lived here. Grand Canyon is one of theRead MoreGrand Canyon National Park, New York City, and the Washington Monunent Short Report1299 Words   |  6 PagesGrand Canyon National Park Short Report The Grand Canyon is one of the most amazing natural wonders in the world. It was originally deposited sediment that was lithofied, and turned into sedimentary rock. The rock was then carved out by hydraulic processes (Warneke). These processes, all combined, took almost three to six million years to form the Grand Canyon. Continued erosion by wind and rain in the present time continues to shift what the canyon looks like, and make it different as time goesRead MoreThe Grand Canyon1545 Words   |  7 PagesThe Grand Canyon National Park contains one of the most well known natural wonders of our country: The Grand Canyon. It is located in Arizona. Over the years, the Grand Canyon has attracted many visitors, and today the park sees nearly five million visitors yearly (NPS, History Culture). It has always been a target for human interest, going back to the days where Native Americans ruled the land and continuing through present times. However, like the rest of our natural world, the Grand Canyon facesRead MoreGrand Canyon Report Essay1224 Words   |  5 PagesThe Grand Canyon National Park Have you ever wondered how it would feel to hike along a canyon that has never before been seen by another man? Or look out into the open and see nothing but vast caves? People from all over the world come to experience that at the Grand Canyon National Park, located entirely in North Arizona. With it’s vast canyons, uncharted caves and valleys, the Grand Canyon is a very popular park for hikers of all sorts, whether you are experienced or beginner, the park offersRead MoreEssay about National Parks Under threat1458 Words   |  6 Pages National Parks: Underthreat Our nations incredible 401 National Parks are some of the most iconic places on the face of the earth. From the Grand Canyon to the Great Smoky Mountains our nations national parks are something we should be proud to have. Lately our National Parks have been under threat from both Environmental and Political issues both putting our National Parks at risk. We need preserve the National Parks for generations to come. The National Parks show the most amazing parts of thisRead MoreDating : The Rocks Of The Grand Canyon1013 Words   |  5 Pages Dating the Rocks of The Grand Canyon (old earth vs. young earth) I. Introduction The Grand Canyon is a National Park located in Arizona where over four billion individuals go to visit yearly (â€Å"Grand Canyon National Park,† n.d.; Hill Moshier, 2009, p. 99). It is over â€Å"18 miles wide†; â€Å"a mile deep†; and â€Å"300 miles long† (â€Å"Grand Canyon National Park,† n.d.; Bohlin, 1993). When looking at the Grand Canyon, there are essentially two sides, the South side and the North side also known as Rims. BothRead MoreWest way to Yellowstone National Park Trip Theme This trip starts from Denver, Colorado to1400 Words   |  6 PagesYellowstone National Park Trip Theme This trip starts from Denver, Colorado to Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. â€Å"Natural landform† is the main theme for this trip. I will explore the mystery of geothermal features in Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone National Park, a national park mostly located in Wyoming, on March 1, 1872 U.S. President You Lixi Simpson Grant Adams signed the bill passed by Congress after the establishment of the worlds first national park. Yellowstone National Park, its abundant

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Qualitative Research Analysis Of Irritable Bowel Syndrome...

Qualitative Research Critical Appraisal The qualitative research is a subjective approach that used to describe life experiences and give them meaning. This assignment is a critical appraisal of the qualitative research article written by Dainty, Allcock and Cooper (2014) entitled: â€Å"Study of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Co-Existing Psychological Illness†. The hermeneutic phenomenology design used throughout the study to understand the individual’s personal experience, the meaning of those experiences, and multiple realities in people’s minds. The researchers used unstructured methods for data collection and thematic analysis to answer the specific research question. As a result, this article may be trustworthy due to†¦show more content†¦Literature Review Although the researchers reviewed the various literature to develop practice guidelines, draw conclusions, create the research question, develop a study design, and find ways to control bias. In fact, it presented key terms, such as hermeneutics, phenomenology, and interview methods (Dainty et al., 2014). Descriptive style helps to ‘bracket’ any preconceptions, since hermeneutic methods acknowledge that an experience could influence its interpretation. The hermeneutic phenomenological design linked to the study question, which based on the experience of multiple realities (Dainty et al., 2014). Overall, the literature reviews adequately linked the interview question and design through interpretative phenomenology theory. Research Design The naturalistic design focuses on the reality that is not fixed, it lies in human minds; thus, the least distance between researchers and participants can maximize understanding. The researchers and participants actively involved in the conversation (Loiselle et al., 2011). The study used a specific hermeneutic phenomenological design to gain a deeper understanding of the nature of the research question (Dainty et al., 2014). Hence, the hermeneutic phenomenology design is an appropriate design for the study because of the nature of the questions. Description of the Target Population Sampling Plan

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Why I Am A Teacher Essay - 1559 Words

INTRODUCTION I believe that because I have wanted to be a teacher since I was a little girl. Not only have I wanted becoming a teacher for many years, but also I have had many teachers in my past, good and bad, who have assisted me in realizing that teaching was the profession for me. I have started to work as a teacher assistant in a school for autistic children. Teaching is a challenging task. One shall perform his duty with the highest degree of excellence, professionalism, intelligence, skill, and with utmost devotion and dedication to ensure the quality of education. It is also the noblest profession. A teacher carries numerous responsibilities. Her task is not just simply delivering the lesson inside the four corners of the classroom but rather serves as the second parent of the students and therefore loves and cares for her students like her real children. As an educator, I strongly believe that nurturing and nourishing all students must be my utmost concern. I dream of students whose fullest potentials are developed to make them become responsible citizens. They must be properly taught to read, write and speak both English and a second language. They must use these languages as an avenue for self-improvement and community building. They must know how to process ideas, compute numbers, solve problems, apply concepts, and make decision s for themselves to make them empowered learners. They must be students who are always hungry for knowledge,Show MoreRelatedWhy I Am A Teacher807 Words   |  4 Pageswhat kind of job a person is going to take, a basic question to answer is about why. Why I want to be a teacher? This is one thing about which I has to be very clear before I decide on anything else such as what type of teacher I desire, or which subject, or where I want to teach. There are several aspects that have motivated me to be a teacher. First, the significant position of education in China makes teacher a most honored and respected role that attracts me. Second, my interest in teachingRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher909 Words   |  4 Pagesin school. At the beginning of high school, I had already acquired plenty of experience writing and had found my style of writing. High School has given me a chance to further explore different ways to write and allowed me to learn what I do and do not like writing about. This past semester of DE English has felt like the next step in my evolution as a writer. During middle school I wrote in my english classes many times just like everyone else. However, I was in a program called â€Å"Focus† from fifthRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher1287 Words   |  6 PagesThe first reason I decided to become a teacher because I have always enjoyed interacting, inspiring and guiding young people. I remember as a kid I always used my little chalkboard and pretend to teach to my friends what I had learned in school. I am also very patient and love to learn new material and explain it to others. The second reason, my ESL teacher during my first high school year was a real inspiration to me; I admire her ability to guide students. The third reason, when I started workingRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher1425 Words   |  6 PagesThe people in my life I have always looked up to the most have been my teachers. When I was a child, they seemed all-powerful, the givers of the knowledge I didn’t even know I sought. Now, as a teenager, I still hold the opinion that educating the next generation is one of the noblest tasks a person can devote themselves to. Like many children, I went through many â€Å"dream career† phases: astronaut first, inspired by the â€Å"Magic School Bus† books, then veterinarian, a seemingly natural fit with my loveRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher Essay1577 Words   |  7 PagesDream Big I clearly remember the day my mother brought home a small wooden desk for me. I cherish that desk so much because not only did I use it to do my homework, but I also used to play school. Even though I was very young, I knew I wanted to be a teacher. So the years went by and I was now a senior in high school and so close to achieving my goal of being a teacher. I knew attending college would be difficult, my parents, older sister, and I had no clue where to begin, or if it was evenRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher933 Words   |  4 Pagesage I remember that being drilled into my brain, if you don’t learn to write you won’t go into the next grade, if your handwriting is too bad you won’t get into the next grade, I remember those words being shoved down my throat every single solitary year of school. When I was starting kindergarten I could already write the basics because my parents thought this was a very important skill and made sure both my brother and I could bot h read and write well enough. I remember the nights where I wouldRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher1913 Words   |  8 PagesEver since I can remember, I’ve wanted to be a teacher. I remember sitting in grade school thinking, â€Å"Someday, I’d love to be doing what my teacher is doing now.† And amazingly, as I grew older, the age level at which I wanted to teach got bigger and bigger. However, as I approached the completion of my high school years, I realized that while teaching was a passion, it wasn’t a profession. It wasn’t the money necessarily (though that is daunting to a student going into education) but I realizedRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher1194 Words   |  5 PagesIntroduction Growing up, I was the daughter and granddaughter of excellent teachers. I always saw how dedicated my mother and grandmother were to their profession. I saw first-hand the late night grading, the parent-teacher conferences, and all the joys and burdens of being a teacher. So, without a doubt I knew I wanted to experience the same joy of being a teacher and being able to inspire students to learn, just like my mother and grandmother. I learned early on that teaching was not a regularRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher1221 Words   |  5 Pagesunique, influential teacher to drive a student into a specific field, and in my case, those teachers were Ms. Kim and Mr. Salters. When I entered fifth grade, I thought math was fun and interesting, but then in Mr. George’s class, I was berated quite loudly in front of the entire class for being an idiot after misplacing a digit. I had loved science and math until that point. For many students, this would be the end of the road for loving math and science. Thankfully, later I was fortunate enoughRead MoreWhy I Am A Teacher Essay859 Words   |  4 PagesTeacher Questionnaire 1. Yes. And I believe teacher minister students beyond just what he/she lectures. When I was teaching art in the university, just my students are asked to be committed in their studies in art, making connection with the practical fields, I hold myself to set an example for students in commitment and integrity as an artist. I believe a teacher plays the role as a guide and a supporter in students’ learning progress. 2. Growing up, I was blessed with several passionate teachers

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

The Vision of the New World That the Colonists Brought to America free essay sample

New England, on the other hand, had developed into a religion and family based society comprised of mostly middle class families by 1700. Looking at the terrain, government, and the people themselves, reveals clues about how the drastic split in society came to be. While residing in England, the Puritans and faithful Catholics faced persecution, which led to their immigration to the New World. Many groups and parishes applied for charters to America and, led by their priest, the Pilgrims and Puritans made the long voyage to North America. Their religion became a unique element in the New England colonies by 1700. Before landing, the groups settled on agreements, signing laws and pacts to ensure a community effort towards survival when they came to shore, and while settling in New England. Their strong sense of community and faith in God led them to develop a hardworking society by year 1700. Their towns were well organized, with the church being the basis of everyones daily life, and they wanted to establish equality and have everyone working together in harmony. Family was an important part of the Puritan religion, so their ships came with twenty-two men and twenty-one women, so there was stability. They learned useful farming techniques from the Native Americans, and farming was their prime source of the economy. The Puritan work ethic kept people from working for extreme material gain. The Puritans were hard workers who had goal for a religiously purified town. Not everyone in England was facing harsh persecution and many travelers came to the New World with high hopes of fame and gold, which led to numerous conflicts. It was a land for the rich to get richer. The people that were assigned to the ships destined for Jamestown (Chesapeake Region) came without their families and their ages ranged from old to young, but mainly oung men. The men outnumbered the women six to one. This caused the society to be more chaotic because there were many broken families and a mad rush for the few women. The settlers in the Chesapeake region main goal were to get rich, or to gain new land and find gold. According to John Smith, all the people could do was live for gold; it was their only purp ose. The Chesapeake Bay settlers had to endure the harshness of their new environment. The climate was not favorable and nearly half of the people died because of exposure to diseases or starvation. Those that were lucky and survived these hardships were left to fight with the local Indians. Dis-organized and unable to find mountains of gold, large tobacco plantations were started and farming was taken up by the settlers. These business men were not use to being agricultural farmers. This was why things were so difficult before John Smith took lead of the colony with his â€Å"You don’t work, you don’t eat† mentality. People were not accustomed to hard work and physical labor, and the colony was dying slow. As a result of the hardships the first importation of slavery began in the colonies. At first indentured servants were being used to work the fields, but they were far less exploited than the slaves. Indentured servants worked for the person who paid their way to the Colony until the depths were paid off, but soon their services were less useful and slaves were being imported in massive numbers. The colonial planters were making money and gaining large profits off of free labor. The development of the two cultures may also have been the result of the terrain the groups occupied. In the Chesapeake region, the colonists settled on swampy marshland that was hard to defend and even more difficult to survive in. With so many people dying from disease and starvation, and the extreme shortage of marriageable women, the population grew slowly, if at all. Families were more groups of mangy children half related, from different fathers. Frequent death made unnatural family life a common thing. In the New England colonies, the people chose flat, manageable ground that left them with easy to plow fields. The soil and religious beliefs were ideal for subsistence farming, which meant small, manageable farms that would provide for a family of eight to ten. Since the farmers looked only to feed themselves, there was little, if any, need for extra abor; having most, if not all, workers available inside their own family. The moderate climate made disease a rarity in the colony, and death even more so. The balanced family life and food supply meant more able-minded colonists. Society had a patriarchal structure of man before woman and woman before child. Children themselves skipped over a childhood and we re treated as adults at a very early age. They were expected to obey their parents and keep faith in the church. All these elements together led to Northern prosperity and growth. The land itself was important, more so was how it became used for profit. This land is money belief was a unique attribute of the region by 1700. The motive for profit also helped to develop society in the Chesapeake region. The Chesapeake men discovered tobacco and began a fierce production of it from their plantations. Since tobacco depleted the soil rapidly, new land was always a must. To acquire this land, wealthy owners paid for servants to be brought over and work the fields. Each was given a land grant of fifty acres, which was not worth all that much. However, the men were bringing over ten, twenty, maybe even thirty servants to work in the tobacco fields. Thirty men at fifty acres a piece add up to a lot of land, so the land owners started to bring in slavery and more black people to work their fields. Instead of growing tobacco, New England farmers were most likely to produce barley or corn, which helped them stay well fed during long winter months. They were more concerned with the survival of their families than the profit they could make from the rich soil, so the food was not sold for a profit. Rather, the colony became self-supporting in the issue of food. With food taken care of, the New England colonies were left to import stoves, tea, and spices, among other things. Since they only needed to grow food to support their own family as subsistence farmers, New England farmers rarely had any more than their original acreage. This created a more equal reality for all owners, comfortable or struggling. The differences between the New England colonies and the Chesapeake colonies led to separate societies by the time of the 1700s. Agriculture, motive, people, religion, and terrain are all factors that affected how they grew apart. However, it is also through the actions of the men and woman who settled in the regions, and the choices they made, that led to the development of these two colonies.

Friday, April 10, 2020

Expectancy vs. Equity

Introduction For organizations to achieve their respective missions, they should motivate their employees and volunteers. Thus, managers/CEOs should establish, ratify, and embrace motivational provisions within the workforce. This is applicable in all organizations (whether for-profit or not) and forms an important requirement in this context. This paper considers the merits of the expectancy and equity theories with regard to employee motivation.Advertising We will write a custom report sample on Expectancy vs. Equity specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More This occurs in order to develop an effective incentive program meant to motivate employees, increasing productivity, and allowing the organization to fulfill its missions considerably as indicated before (Humphreys Einstein, 2004). The designed program will serve to motivate both employees and volunteers of non-profit organizations. It will also consider how to utilize monetary and non-monetary factors effectively. Identifying unique interests of the non-profit managers Evidently, managers of non-profit organizations possess unique interests meant to enable them accomplish their respective obligations. This regards organizational growth and achievement of desired objectives. Since such organizations are not aiming to make huge monetary returns (non-profit), it is important that they attain their preset objectives. This is only achievable when employees are highly motivated and strive to accomplish their respective obligations. Precisely, non-profit managers endeavor to work with limited resources, have a mission-driven workforce, attain a prosperous organization, and accomplish the organization’s obligations promptly as scheduled. As indicated before, this provision requires motivated employees and volunteers charged to accomplish their mandates in a timely manner. Additionally, there are different types and levels of personnel that the developed plan s hould recognize. In this context, any non-profit organization might have volunteers, subordinate staff, junior employees, line managers, unit managers, CEOs, and directors plus their deputies. These are major groups constituting the entire workforce; nonetheless, each group can be subdivided to suit the missions and structure of the concerned organization.Advertising Looking for report on business economics? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Equity, Expectancy, or Hybrid The principles of both Equity and expectancy theories can be adopted in developing a useful recognition plan for motivating employees. Equity theory indicates that employees will be motivated if they realize that the benefits (both monetary and non-monetary) they obtain from their employer (concerned non-profit organization) equal or surpass those of other organizations operating in the similar caliber. This is a critical provision when considered on the workfo rce’s context. In case the benefits are less, it is probable that employees and volunteers will be less motivated. This might interfere with their overall productivity (Klein, 1973). Conversely, expectancy theory indicates that the future prospects of employees can motivate them considerably. Creating positive expectations or outcomes for future organizational events can obviously motivate the concerned workforce. This is a crucial consideration in the entire operational and motivational contexts. Upon critical deliberations, it is important to argue that either equity theory or expectancy theory cannot be applied solitarily for developing the desired recognition plan in the realms of workforce motivation. For this matter, a hybrid approach will be quite appropriate. As employees compare their respective benefits with those of others entities (equity theory), they should also prospect positive events in future (expectancy theory). These will obviously raise their morale hence accomplishing their duties promptly. The organization will eventually obtain its missions in the similar context. Hence, combining the two theories (hybrid approach) will be contextually preferable. Explaining how Equity or Expectancy theory is more effective in motivating employees at different levels Both equity and expectancy theories are helpful in motivating employees as alleged earlier. With regard to the equity theory, it is recognizable that employees will observe the aspects of impartiality, fairness, and justice practiced by the management. If they perceive these provisions positively, they will obviously get motivated (Skiba Rosenberg, 2011). Conversely, the aspects of unfairness, inequality, and injustice will obviously demoralize the concerned workforce.Advertising We will write a custom report sample on Expectancy vs. Equity specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More This provision indicates the applicability of equity theo ry in the context of motivation. Both equity and expectancy theories are applicable and effective in motivating employees at different levels within the organization. Both CEOs and administrative assistants require equity, fairness, and justice in their job specifications in order to perform considerably. Concurrently, Expectancy theory equally provides employees with such provisions. All employees and volunteers regardless of the rank need to have positive expectations and future organizational and individual prospects in order to remain focused and motivated in their works. The theory renders employees (the entire workforce) hopeful in their endeavors. They consequently desire to achieve the projected objectives both at personal organizational level. Justifying expectancy or equity theory in managing workforce It is justifiable that both equity and expectancy theories are viable provisions in managing workforce (from a non-profit organization in this context). This is evident in a rticulating its impacts on both paid staff and volunteer workers. Both groups need motivational provisions in their endeavors. Additionally, there should be no differences developed in the recognition programs for all categories of staff. Equity should be exercised within the entire organization and to all employees regardless of their ranks. Employees and volunteers should be treated equitably and accordingly. This is a critical condition in the entire context. Concurrently, the organization should set future prospects, which are motivating to the entire workforce. Despite the variability of job specifications among different employees, the ultimate motivational aspects should be universal for all. Presence or Absence of a reward system for organizational performance, divisional performance, individual performance, or combination Incentives and rewards are important provisions within the workforce. Their presence or absence within the organization can pose considerable impacts. Pre cisely, the presence of a viable reward system within the organization can enhance performance since employees will be highly motivated, prospective, and productive. Consequently, the organization will attain its objectives in a timely manner.Advertising Looking for report on business economics? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Conversely, the absence of such reward systems will demoralize employees and volunteers. This will reduce organizational performance. Concurrently, similar effects will be realized with the divisional performance (Chen, Gupta Hoshower, 2006). The presence of reward systems will enhance the division performance while its absence will deprive it. When individual employees are less motivated, it is agreeable that their performances will diminish. This indicates why it is very important to establish, ratify, and nurture reward systems within non-profit organizations. How equity and expectancy theory address group versus individual goals Equity and expectancy theories tend to address group goals by advocating for uniformity in the realms of fairness, justice, and impartiality within the workforce. Additionally, they create common prospective expectations within the entire organization (Miner, 2007). Consequently, both employees and the management will endeavor to accomplish their obliga tions for the company to attain its projected missions. Individuals will equally gain their respective goals and projected motivation. Conclusion Non-profit organizations’ managers have unique interests in their endeavors. It is important to conclude that both equity and expectancy theories are applicable within non-profit organizations. This relates to benefits they offer with respect to employees’ motivation. This is a critical concern when scrutinized decisively. It is important to create a plan that addresses these provisions with vastness, precision, and appropriateness. References Chen, Y., Gupta, A. Hoshower, L. (2006). Factors that motivate business faculty to conduct research: An expectancy theory analysis. Journal of Education for Business, 81(4), 179-189. Humphreys, J. Einstein, W. (2004). Leadership and temperament congruence: Extending the expectancy model of work motivation. Journal of Leadership Organizational Studies, 10(4), 58-79. Klein, S. (1973). Pay factors as predictors to satisfaction: A comparison of reinforcement, equity, and expectancy. Academy of Management Journal (Pre-1986), 16(4), 598-598. Miner, J. (2007). Organizational behavior: New York, NY: M.E. Sharpe. Skiba, M. Rosenberg, S. (2011). The disutility of equity theory in contemporary management practice. The Journal of Business and Economic Studies, 17(2), 1-19. This report on Expectancy vs. Equity was written and submitted by user Ian U. to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Milestones In Communications

The capabilities of modern communications would utterly astound our ancestors. Did you ever stop to think that it took five months for Queen Isabella to hear of Columbus' discovery, or that it took two weeks for Europe to learn of Lincoln's assassination? We take for granted immediate news of everything that is going on in the world, but it was not always so. Modern technology and future predictions are easier to comprehend when we view them in terms of our past. What follows next is a list of what we consider some of the more significant events in the annals of communication. Our list is arbitrary and includes items chosen not only for technological innovation, but for creativity and human interest as well. The Battle of Marathon „o Pheidippides' Run For centuries, the speed of communication was, in essence, the speed of transportation. Perhaps no event so dramatizes this limitation as Pheidippides' run following the battle of Marathon in 490 BC. As told in the history books, a badly outnumbered Greek force defeated an invading Persian army on the plains of Marathon, 20 miles from Athens. Fearing that the defeated Persians would regroup and attack Athens and that the city would surrender without knowing of the victory, the Greek general dispatched his swiftest runner, Pheidippides. As he reached the city, Pheidippides stumbled, delivered his message, and fell dead of exhaustion. Paul Revere ¡Ã‚ ¦s Ride "One if by land and two if by sea" refers to lanterns hung from the North Church in Boston in 1775 to indicate the route the British were taking. The lanterns were the signal for Paul Revere to begin his famous midnight ride, perhaps the most famous communication in American history, immortalized by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem. In actuality, Revere made two rides, on April 16 (to warn the patriots to move their military supplies) and again on April 18 (to tell the people to take up arms.) Few people know that Revere ... Free Essays on Milestones In Communications Free Essays on Milestones In Communications The capabilities of modern communications would utterly astound our ancestors. Did you ever stop to think that it took five months for Queen Isabella to hear of Columbus' discovery, or that it took two weeks for Europe to learn of Lincoln's assassination? We take for granted immediate news of everything that is going on in the world, but it was not always so. Modern technology and future predictions are easier to comprehend when we view them in terms of our past. What follows next is a list of what we consider some of the more significant events in the annals of communication. Our list is arbitrary and includes items chosen not only for technological innovation, but for creativity and human interest as well. The Battle of Marathon „o Pheidippides' Run For centuries, the speed of communication was, in essence, the speed of transportation. Perhaps no event so dramatizes this limitation as Pheidippides' run following the battle of Marathon in 490 BC. As told in the history books, a badly outnumbered Greek force defeated an invading Persian army on the plains of Marathon, 20 miles from Athens. Fearing that the defeated Persians would regroup and attack Athens and that the city would surrender without knowing of the victory, the Greek general dispatched his swiftest runner, Pheidippides. As he reached the city, Pheidippides stumbled, delivered his message, and fell dead of exhaustion. Paul Revere ¡Ã‚ ¦s Ride "One if by land and two if by sea" refers to lanterns hung from the North Church in Boston in 1775 to indicate the route the British were taking. The lanterns were the signal for Paul Revere to begin his famous midnight ride, perhaps the most famous communication in American history, immortalized by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem. In actuality, Revere made two rides, on April 16 (to warn the patriots to move their military supplies) and again on April 18 (to tell the people to take up arms.) Few people know that Revere ...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Personality Analyiss Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3750 words

Personality Analyiss - Essay Example There are also some, who regard personality as a diamond consisting of diverse facets of behavior and belief. Still there are others who argue that the whole notion of personality is wrong headed – a comfortable fiction rather than a scientific fact. Usually in this view, personality is often influenced by the immediate circumstances rather by the social interactions, that is, personality remains consistent due to the environmental factors that also remain unchanged. Significantly, personality has been postulated and analyzed by a number of experts in the field of behavioral science, and as a result, a number of theories elaborating the nature and rationale have emerged, thereby providing a wide area for interpretation and further research. This essay presents an analysis of a fictional character from a popular television series entitled, CSI. The character of Gil Grissom is the main subject of this study in the aim to dissect and point out certain specific traits and explain them according to the theories advanced by several personality psychologists more particularly of Howard S. Friedman and Miriam W. Schustac. The succeeding paragraph will also present arguments that will validate the presence of these theories in the chosen fictional character to establish a solid ground for conclusion. At the age of 22, Gill Grissom became the youngest coroner in LA County. He was recruited to run the field service office in Las Vegas where he spent 17 years elevating the status of the Vegas laboratory into the second most efficient crime lab in the United States. Earning a biology degree from UCLA, Grissom worked as a night shift supervisor of the Las Vegas Crime Unit. Being a forensic entomologist and a CSI level three, he was knows as the ‘bug man’ amongst his colleagues which was originally composed of Catherine Willows, Nick Stokes, Warrick Brown and Sarah Sidle in the first few seasons. Eventually